hecallsmepineappleprincess:

castielscompanion:

ollivander:

herekitty:


Women dressed as mermaids in Disneyland 1960


HOLLERS NO U DON’T UNDERSTAND!!!! Disney hired teenagers in the 60’s to literally be mermaids they held open auditions and the only requirements were that you had long hair and were a strong swimmer and they gave them mirrors and other props and they literally spent their days swimming and waving I heard a story once about sailors visiting the park and one of them jumped in with the mermaids THIS WAS JUST„ SO COOL I WANT TO BE A MERMAID! YELLs

I know someone whose Mom was one of the mermaids, it’s all very cool.

They had to stop because of the chlorine affecting the girls and because of men trying to jump in to get to them.I would have loved to see Disneyland mermaids today though!

hecallsmepineappleprincess:

castielscompanion:

ollivander:

herekitty:


Women dressed as mermaids in Disneyland 1960


HOLLERS NO U DON’T UNDERSTAND!!!! Disney hired teenagers in the 60’s to literally be mermaids they held open auditions and the only requirements were that you had long hair and were a strong swimmer and they gave them mirrors and other props and they literally spent their days swimming and waving I heard a story once about sailors visiting the park and one of them jumped in with the mermaids THIS WAS JUST„ SO COOL I WANT TO BE A MERMAID! YELLs

I know someone whose Mom was one of the mermaids, it’s all very cool.

They had to stop because of the chlorine affecting the girls and because of men trying to jump in to get to them.I would have loved to see Disneyland mermaids today though!

hecallsmepineappleprincess:

castielscompanion:

ollivander:

herekitty:

Women dressed as mermaids in Disneyland 1960

HOLLERS NO U DON’T UNDERSTAND!!!! Disney hired teenagers in the 60’s to literally be mermaids they held open auditions and the only requirements were that you had long hair and were a strong swimmer and they gave them mirrors and other props and they literally spent their days swimming and waving I heard a story once about sailors visiting the park and one of them jumped in with the mermaids THIS WAS JUST„ SO COOL I WANT TO BE A MERMAID! YELLs

I know someone whose Mom was one of the mermaids, it’s all very cool.

They had to stop because of the chlorine affecting the girls and because of men trying to jump in to get to them.
I would have loved to see Disneyland mermaids today though!

(Source: drsimples, via itshadrian)

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tastefullyoffensive:

[beeslo]

tastefullyoffensive:

[beeslo]

tastefullyoffensive:

[beeslo]

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dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)  van dusen botanical gardens vancouver, bc, ca

dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)  van dusen botanical gardens vancouver, bc, ca

dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)  van dusen botanical gardens vancouver, bc, ca

dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)  van dusen botanical gardens vancouver, bc, ca

dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)  van dusen botanical gardens vancouver, bc, ca

dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)  van dusen botanical gardens vancouver, bc, ca

dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)  van dusen botanical gardens vancouver, bc, ca

dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)  van dusen botanical gardens vancouver, bc, ca

dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)  van dusen botanical gardens vancouver, bc, ca

dakotarosewood:

(movement with hydrangeas)
van dusen botanical gardens
vancouver, bc, ca

(via galaxy-doll)

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delectabledelight:

IMG_5588 (by kangbox31)https://www.flickr.com/photos/58228591@N06/15282049642/in/pool-1772012@N22

delectabledelight:

IMG_5588 (by kangbox31)

(via candyxxholika)

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onlylolgifs:

x

onlylolgifs:

x

onlylolgifs:

x

onlylolgifs:

x

onlylolgifs:

x

onlylolgifs:

x

(via button-pusher)

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I like these.

I like these.

I like these.

I like these.

I like these.

I like these.

I like these.

I like these.

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lustik:

Thread Lines - Mónica Bengoa -  The Drawing Center.
Lustik: twitter | pinterest | etsy

lustik:

Thread Lines - Mónica Bengoa -  The Drawing Center.
Lustik: twitter | pinterest | etsy

lustik:

Thread Lines - Mónica Bengoa -  The Drawing Center.
Lustik: twitter | pinterest | etsy

lustik:

Thread Lines - Mónica Bengoa -  The Drawing Center.
Lustik: twitter | pinterest | etsy

lustik:

Thread Lines - Mónica Bengoa -  The Drawing Center.
Lustik: twitter | pinterest | etsy

lustik:

Thread Lines - Mónica Bengoa -  The Drawing Center.
Lustik: twitter | pinterest | etsy

lustik:

Thread Lines - Mónica BengoaThe Drawing Center.

Lustik: twitter | pinterest | etsy

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ideasgn:

Kuokkala Church by OOPEAA

ideasgn:

Kuokkala Church by OOPEAA

ideasgn:

Kuokkala Church by OOPEAA

ideasgn:

Kuokkala Church by OOPEAA

(Source: ideasgn.com)

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“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 


“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 


“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 


“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 


“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 


“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 


“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 


“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 


“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 

Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 

(Source: facebook.com, via buckybear)

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(Source: pamyurina, via thetarrpit)

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(Source: eye-cancer, via lovely-tunes)

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cinnahearts:

休憩中 (by hirotomo)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/travelstar/13374647503

cinnahearts:

休憩中 (by hirotomo)

(via -kokoro)

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actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty

This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces.

Interesting notes

"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

(via chokelate)

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periwinklebleu:

period panties

periwinklebleu:

period panties

periwinklebleu:

period panties

periwinklebleu:

period panties

periwinklebleu:

period panties

(Source: free-parking, via awear)

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My friend phones me up and goes like, “Hey, I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart!” He didn’t say Charles Xavier, he didn’t say Professor X, he said I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart.


My friend phones me up and goes like, “Hey, I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart!” He didn’t say Charles Xavier, he didn’t say Professor X, he said I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart.


My friend phones me up and goes like, “Hey, I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart!” He didn’t say Charles Xavier, he didn’t say Professor X, he said I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart.


My friend phones me up and goes like, “Hey, I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart!” He didn’t say Charles Xavier, he didn’t say Professor X, he said I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart.

My friend phones me up and goes like, “Hey, I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart!” He didn’t say Charles Xavier, he didn’t say Professor X, he said I hear you’re going to be playing Patrick Stewart.

(Source: xavierstea, via quirinuus)

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